People can’t be forced to believe: No Inquisitions, please

22 Nov

Here’s today’s COMMENT FROM AN OLD FART: Moi believes in God, that the Bible is the inspired Word of God, and that there is a Heaven as well as a Hell. Having said that, moi does not support an Inquisition Moi believes in the protections of the First Amendment which guarantee, not the abolition of ALL religion from the public square, but the freedom to believe or not believe. Additionally, moi believes that people must come to faith voluntarily and of their own free will. That brings us to report about a teen sentenced to church.

Linda Williams reports in the KSL.Com News report, Teen sentenced to 10 years of church attendance:

A district judge in Oklahoma has generated new controversy by sentencing a teenager to 10 years of church attendance, even though the judge admits it’s not constitutional.

Religion News Services reports Judge Mike Norman gave Tyler Alred, 17, a 10-year deferred sentence for DUI manslaughter. Alred was driving a pickup truck that crashed and killed a passenger in December 2011.

In deferring the sentence, the judge not only ordered Alred to a decade of church attendance, but also required him to finish high school and welding school.

Alred’s attorney and the victim’s family agreed to the terms of the sentence.

The ACLU in Oklahoma calls the church requirement a “clear violation of the First Amendment.”

Judge Norman, who has recommended church as part of sentencing in some past cases, admits the church attendance part of the sentence won’t hold up legally but doubts either side in the case will appeal.

He says the sentence was the right thing to do.

The ACLU is considering its options, but according to RNS an individual or organization must have legal standing to challenge the constitutionality of the church attendance requirement. http://www.ksl.com/?nid=1016&sid=23047435

Many people all over the world aspire to the guarantees of the U.S. Constitution.

This is what the 1966 UN International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, says:

expanding its prior statement to address the manifestation of religion or belief. Article 18 of this Covenant includes four paragraphs related to this issue:

1. Everyone shall have the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion. This right shall include freedom to have or to adopt a religion or belief of his [her] choice, and freedom either individually or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his [her] religion or belief in worship, observance, practice and teaching.
2. No one shall be subject to coercion which would impair his [her] freedom to have or to adopt a religion or belief of his [her] choice.
3. Freedom to manifest one’s religion or belief may be subject only to such limitations as are prescribed by law and are necessary to protect public safety, order, health, morals or the fundamental rights and freedoms of others.
4. The States Parties to the present Covenant undertake to have respect for the liberty of parents and, when applicable, legal guardians, to ensure the religious and moral education of their children in conformity with their own convictions.
http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts/edumat/studyguides/religion.html

This is what the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution says:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/data/constitution/amendment01/

People must come to faith of their own free will. The U.S. Constitution guarantees the right to freely practice one’s religion. Despite what many intolerant atheists believe that does not mean that religion must be excised from the public square. Neither does it mean that any particular faith should be forced on another.

Religion is like a pair of shoes…..Find one that fits for you, but don’t make me wear your shoes.”
George Carlin

Religious liberty might be supposed to mean that everybody is free to discuss religion. In practice it means that hardly anybody is allowed to mention it.”
G.K. Chesterton

Blogs by Dr. Wilda:

COMMENTS FROM AN OLD FART © https://drwildaoldfart.wordpress.com/

Dr. Wilda Reviews ©                           http://drwildareviews.wordpress.com/

Dr. Wilda ©                                                                                http://drwilda.com/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: